9 Practices that Haunt Developers Working with Scrum

September 19, 2022 Leave a comment

View at Medium.com

Why Scrum has a bad name
Scrum promised to be liberating for developers. It should have been a radical shift from the command and control practices that defined many waterfall projects. Scrum is about self-managing teams and sustainable pace. It should be an “ennobling experience” (Agile Software Development with Scrum (Schwaber and Beedle), 2001).

The world is flooded with Scrum Trainers, Agile Coaches, and Scrum Masters that spread this message of self-managing Scrum Teams who determine what they do and by when.

But the reality is very different for many Scrum teams and developers suffer from this. Many feel nothing has changed for the better. In fact, some think Scrum is worse than waterfall.

Here are 9 practices that haunt developers working with Scrum.

Source:
https://www.programmerweekly.com/

Categories: Interesting

Recipes from Python SQLite docs

September 16, 2022 Leave a comment

While going through the documentation of Python’s sqlite3 module, I noticed that it’s quite API-driven, where different parts of the module are explained in a prescriptive manner. I, however, learn better from examples, recipes, and narratives. Although a few good recipes already exist in the docs, I thought I’d also enlist some of the examples I tried out while grokking them.

https://rednafi.github.io/reflections/recipes-from-python-sqlite-docs.html

Categories: Interesting

Machine Learning From Scratch

September 15, 2022 Leave a comment

To master machine learning models, one of the best things you can do is to implement them yourself. Although it might seem like a difficult task, for most algorithms, it is actually easier than you think. So throughout the next 10 days, we will implement one machine learning algorithm each day using Python and sometimes the help of Numpy for certain calculations.

You can find the code in our GitHub repository: https://github.com/AssemblyAI-Example…

The algorithms we will go over are:
1. K-Nearest Neighbours
2. Linear Regression
3. Logistic Regression
4. Decision Trees
5. Random Forest
6. Naive Bayes
7. PCA
8. Perceptron
9. SVM
10. KMeans

Watch the first lesson: https://youtu.be/rTEtEy5o3X0

Categories: Interesting, python

React – Proxy error: Could not proxy request

June 18, 2022 Leave a comment

Problem:
I was getting the following error
“Proxy error: Could not proxy request See https://nodejs.org/api/errors.html#errors_common_system_errors for more information (ECONNREFUSED).”

Solution:
Change in package.json

"proxy": "http://localhost:5000"

To

"proxy": "http://127.0.0.1:5000"

No idea why this works. When I do a curl on localhost:5000 I get back a response. SMH. This was working previously with node version 16, but not anymore with node version 18.

Source:
https://stackoverflow.com/questions/45367298/could-not-proxy-request-pusher-auth-from-localhost3000-to-http-localhost500

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Learning Containers From The Bottom Up

June 7, 2022 Leave a comment

When I started using containers back in 2015, my initial understanding was that they were just lightweight virtual machines with a subsecond startup time. With such a rough idea in my head, it was easy to follow tutorials from the Internet on how to put a Python or a Node.js application into a container. But pretty quickly, I realized that thinking of containers as of VMs is a risky oversimplification that doesn’t allow me to judge:

  • What’s doable with containers and what’s not
  • What’s an idiomatic use of containers and what’s not
  • What’s safe to run in containers and what’s not.

Since the “container is a VM” abstraction turned out to be quite leaky, I had to start looking into the technology’s internals to understand what containers really are, and Docker was the most obvious starting point. But Docker is a behemoth doing a wide variety of things, and the apparent simplicity of docker run nginx can be deceptive. There was plenty of materials on Docker, but most of them were:

  • Either shallow introductory tutorials
  • Or hard reads indigestible for a newbie.

So, it took me a while to pave my way through the containerverse.

This article is not an attempt to explain containers in one go. Instead, it’s a front-page for my multi-year study of the domain. It outlines the said learning path and then walks you through it, pointing to more in-depth write-ups on this same blog.

Mastering containers is no simple task, so take your time, and don’t skip the hands-on parts!

https://iximiuz.com/en/posts/container-learning-path/

Categories: Interesting Tags:

Common Python Anti-Patterns to watch out for

April 27, 2022 Leave a comment

Anti-patterns which will make you more mindful while writing code.

In software, anti-pattern is a term that describes how NOT to solve recurring problems in your code. Anti-patterns are considered bad software design, and are usually ineffective or obscure fixes.

https://tvkoushik.medium.com/common-python-anti-patterns-to-watch-out-for-9271d13a3f8e

Categories: Interesting

TDD Excel File Download API with Flask

March 20, 2022 Leave a comment

Test-driven development (TDD) is a very useful development technique. However, some features are particularly difficult to test. One example is to download files.
Recently, I have just “TDDed” a file download feature in python Flask. During development, there was not a complete guide on how to TDD it. So to help save effort and time for other engineer friends, this blog will give a simplified example of using TDD to drive an excel file download API.

https://medium.com/abetterconsultancy/tdd-excel-file-download-api-with-flask-d432bb72e888

Categories: Interesting Tags: , ,

A Complete Guide to Flexbox

March 12, 2022 Leave a comment

Our comprehensive guide to CSS flexbox layout. This complete guide explains everything about flexbox, focusing on all the different possible properties for the parent element (the flex container) and the child elements (the flex items). It also includes history, demos, patterns, and a browser support chart.

https://css-tricks.com/snippets/css/a-guide-to-flexbox/

Categories: Interesting Tags:

A Guide to Solving Those Mystifying CORS Issues

February 7, 2022 Leave a comment

Imagine you’re building the UI. You need to connect to remote API to get or send some data. Everything works fine when you test your REST calls with curl, but when you implement them in the UI, it does not.

First, you check the code, looking for some typos or other mistakes —but everything seems to be fine. You change the URL to Google.com or something, and find out that the http call is working. The issue appears only when calling that specific API. But it works perfectly fine via command line or Postman. What’s going on then?

https://blog.container-solutions.com/a-guide-to-solving-those-mystifying-cors-issues

Categories: Interesting Tags:

Security considerations in Python packing

January 30, 2022 Leave a comment

Gajendra Deshpande
Founder & Managing Director at Eyesec Cyber Security Solutions

Popular programming language index websites (TIOBE index) and developer surveys (Stack Overflow) place Python as one of the fastest-growing programming languages. However, this popularity also puts in the target range of attackers. The attackers perform malicious dependency attacks and use misconfiguration tools to reveal confidential information. Jukka Ruohonen, Kalle Hjerppe, and Kalle Rindell in their research paper “”A Large-Scale Security-Oriented Static Analysis of Python Packages in PyPI”” claimed that they scanned PyPI for security issues in Python packages and found the presence of at least one security issue in about 46% of the Python packages.

In addition, security vulnerabilities can be present in the source code of the package. In this talk, we will address the security issues related to python packaging and possible solutions to make python packages secure. The talk begins with the importance of a secure package and vulnerabilities in the Python package index. Then, I will discuss Python packages such as Bandit for identifying common security issues in Python code and “safety” for dependency check. Next, I will discuss verifying and signing Python packages using GPG. Finally, I will discuss general guidelines for secure coding practices in Python.

Outline
1. Importance of a secure package and vulnerabilities in python package index. (05 Minutes)
2. Bandit for identifying common security issues in Python code (4 Minutes)
3. Safety for dependency check (4 Minutes)
4. Verifying and signing PyPI and conda packages using GPG and Twine (4 Minutes)
5. General guidelines for secure coding practices in Python (5 Minutes)
6. Summary and Questions (3 Minutes)

Other talks at this conference 🚀🪐 https://www.conf42.com​/python2022

Categories: Interesting