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Archive for January, 2019

Sane GitHub Labels

January 15, 2019 Leave a comment

TLDR; the default GitHub labels kinda suck; use a sane labelling scheme instead; and use git-labelmaker to simplify GitHub label editing.

https://medium.com/@dave_lunny/sane-github-labels-c5d2e6004b63

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Categories: Interesting

GNU Makefile setting env variables

January 12, 2019 Leave a comment

Problem:
Exporting env variables in Makefiles. The issue was that the environment variables were not visible across different targets. I needed the same env vars to be seen in both target1 and target2 below.

Solution:
Export the variables outside the target, eg at the top of the file.

VALUE1="myvalue1"
VALUE2="myvalue2"

export VALUE1
export VALUE2

target1:
    echo $VALUE1

target2:
    echo $VALUE2

Source:
https://stackoverflow.com/questions/2826029/passing-additional-variables-from-command-line-to-make
https://www.linuxquestions.org/questions/programming-9/exporting-makefile-variables-to-%24-shell-environment-807422/

Categories: bash, Interesting Tags: ,

DevTernity 2017: Ian Cooper – TDD, Where Did It All Go Wrong

January 9, 2019 Leave a comment

Since Kent Beck wrote the book on TDD in 2002 a lot of words have been dedicated to the subject. But many of them propagated misunderstandings of Kent’s original rules so that TDD practice bears little resemblance to Kent’s original ideas. Key misunderstandings around what do I test, what is a unit test, and what is the ‘public interface’ have led to test suites that are brittle, hard to read, and do not support easy refactoring. In this talk, we re-discover Kent’s original proposition, discover where key misunderstandings occurred and look at a better approach to TDD that supports software development instead of impeding it. Be prepared from some sacred cows to be slaughtered and fewer but better tests to be written.

Categories: Interesting Tags: ,

Keep a Changelog

January 4, 2019 Leave a comment

What is a changelog?

A changelog is a file which contains a curated, chronologically ordered list of notable changes for each version of a project.
Why keep a changelog?

To make it easier for users and contributors to see precisely what notable changes have been made between each release (or version) of the project.
Who needs a changelog?

People do. Whether consumers or developers, the end users of software are human beings who care about what’s in the software. When the software changes, people want to know why and how.


https://keepachangelog.com/en/1.0.0/

Categories: Interesting