Home > Interesting > How to Set Up a Prometheus, Grafana and Alertmanager Monitoring Stack on DigitalOcean Kubernetes

How to Set Up a Prometheus, Grafana and Alertmanager Monitoring Stack on DigitalOcean Kubernetes

Introduction

Along with tracing and logging, monitoring and alerting are essential components of a Kubernetes observability stack. Setting up monitoring for your DigitalOcean Kubernetes cluster allows you to track your resource usage and analyze and debug application errors.

A monitoring system usually consists of a time-series database that houses metric data and a visualization layer. In addition, an alerting layer creates and manages alerts, handing them off to integrations and external services as necessary. Finally, one or more components generate or expose the metric data that will be stored, visualized, and processed for alerts by the stack.

One popular monitoring solution is the open-source Prometheus, Grafana, and Alertmanager stack, deployed alongside kube-state-metrics and node_exporter to expose cluster-level Kubernetes object metrics as well as machine-level metrics like CPU and memory usage.

Rolling out this monitoring stack on a Kubernetes cluster requires configuring individual components, manifests, Prometheus metrics, and Grafana dashboards, which can take some time. The DigitalOcean Kubernetes Cluster Monitoring Quickstart, released by the DigitalOcean Community Developer Education team, contains fully defined manifests for a Prometheus-Grafana-Alertmanager cluster monitoring stack, as well as a set of preconfigured alerts and Grafana dashboards. It can help you get up and running quickly, and forms a solid foundation from which to build your observability stack.

In this tutorial, we’ll deploy this preconfigured stack on DigitalOcean Kubernetes, access the Prometheus, Grafana, and Alertmanager interfaces, and describe how to customize it.

https://www.digitalocean.com/community/tutorials/how-to-set-up-a-prometheus-grafana-and-alertmanager-monitoring-stack-on-digitalocean-kubernetes

Categories: Interesting Tags:
  1. No comments yet.
  1. No trackbacks yet.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.

%d bloggers like this: